20.08.2015 - Commodity indexing embraces new methods
It was 2012, and energy executives and policy specialists were excited by the promise of shale gas. From Texas to Pennsylvania, a bonanza was under way. But inside the downtown Manhattan offices of S&P Dow Jones Indices, record US gas production was causing a problem. Oversupply was filling storage caverns, reducing returns from futures contracts for the product, disrupting an important benchmark used by investors. The total return version of the S&P GSCI gas index had collapsed to a value of 0.58 from 100 when it launched. “The index value had declined to such a low level that it became prohibitive for people to price products on it,” recalls Michael McGlone, a former S&P senior director of commodity indexing. “It’s difficult to track an index that’s priced at less than one.”..............................................Full Article: Source
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