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Investing in Africa a Proxy for Investing in China?
Radio Feature 57: Aly-Khan Satchu in conversation with Sona Blessing
 
Tuesday, September 11, 2012
at the NZZ Capital Market Forum in Zurich

radio Aly-Khan Satchu is CEO of Rich Management Limited.
Since 2009 he has been an active investor on the Nairobi Stock Exchange, The Uganda Securities Exchange and on various other African stock markets. Since 2003 Aly-Khan has traded his own funds - primarily commodities (particularly oil), currency futures and options, equity indices and single stocks.

In previous positions he ran global trading desks for Credit Suisse First Boston (Emerging Markets) and lived through the financial crisis in Latin America in 1994 at a time when he had lent more than USD2 billion in that market. From 1998-1999 Aly-Khan was Treasurer and Director of all collateralised lending at ANZ Investment Bank. He also served as an Executive Director at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein in charge of Emerging Market Financing and Short Term Interest rates.

 Download this feature as MP3 (8.75 MB)

 
Listen to the complete feature
Investing in Africa a Proxy for Investing in China?

Duration: 09:33 

 

Or listen to selected sub-features
  • Q1 - The investment opportunities in Africa and why investors shouldn't be investing through the "rear view mirror" investing?

    Duration: 01:33 


  • Q2 - One of the issues that has turned investors off seems to be the socio-political risk? So how do you address that?

    Duration: 01:59 


  • Q3 - Is investing in Africa a proxy to investing in China, given the slowdown in the latter's growth?

    Duration: 00:57 


  • Q4 - Would you say that the investors that are taking on this risk are being commensurately rewarded?

    Duration: 00:51 


  • Q5 - Is inflation jeopardising real returns?

    Duration: 01:09 


  • Q6 - Despite of the higher volatility and beta, from an investment perspective could you share your "best picks"?

    Duration: 01:50 


  • Q7 - You don't believe this is the most opportune time to be investing in South Africa - could you elaborate on why?

    Duration: 01:15 



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