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"China Likes to Experiment."
Radio Feature 98: Sona Blessing in conversation with Stuart Leckie
 
Friday, April 25, 2014

radio Stuart Leckie is Chairman of Stirling Finance. He is based in Hong Kong and advises on investments and pensions in Hong Kong and Mainland China. He is the author of books titled "Pension Funds in China" and "Investment Funds in China". He has also served as the Chairman of Towers Watson (formerly Watson Wyatt) in Asia-Pacific and as Chairman of Fidelity Investments, Asia-Pacific. Amongst others he has advised the Chinese Government on pensions reform and advised the Hong Kong Government on the establishment of the Mandatory Provident Fund.

 Download this feature as MP3 (33.48 MB)

 
Listen to the complete feature
"China Likes to Experiment"

Duration: 14:37 

 

Or listen to selected sub-features
  • Q1 - Would you say China’s financial stability hinges on increasing property prices?
    There are indicators that suggest that increasing real estate prices may no longer be sustainable?

    Duration: 02:08 


  • Q2 - How do you assess the contradictory signals that, for instance, come from information such as: borrower’s weakening asset monetisation ability; solvency and higher default ratios; risky and repeatedly pledged collateral; excessive use of leverage (20%); land/property- inventory mismatch between demand and supply ...

    Duration: 02:43 


  • Q3 - What are the economic, financial and capital market implications of the yuan bond market’s first default?

    Duration: 03:38 


  • Q4 - So at this point, does China's economy pose global systemic risk?

    Duration: 01:00 


  • Q5 - “In 2014, around US$660 billion of trust products alone mature.”
    How do you see this impacting the economy?

    Duration: 00:52 


  • Q6 - What is the government doing to make the yuan more convertible?

    Duration: 02:48 


  • Q7 - What are some of the measures the Chinese government has undertaken to enhance investor participation onshore capital/financial market activities?

    Duration: 01:29 



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