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GlobeOp appoints Eamonn Greaves as global head of Business Development

Wednesday, December 07, 2011
Opalesque Industry Update – GlobeOp Financial Services has appointed Eamonn Greaves as head of business development. Greaves reports to Hans Hufschmid, chief executive officer, and is based in the company’s New York City headquarters.

Greaves is a managing director at GlobeOp and previously led the company’s Hartford, CT office, with responsibility for regional fund accounting and operations.

“Eamonn brings comprehensive technical product knowledge, a deep understanding of our client service model and market experience to his new position,” said Hans Hufschmid. “Since joining GlobeOp in 2001 he has worked extensively with clients to identify and support their evolving needs. In recent years, he’s developed particular expertise in services for large managed account platforms and business process outsourcing (BPO) clients.”

(press release)

GlobeOp Financial Services (LSE:GO.) is an independent administrator of middle and back office services, integrated risk reporting and portfolio analytics for hedge funds, managed accounts and fund of funds. Our expertise further extends to family wealth offices, insurance companies, pension funds, corporate treasuries and private/regional banks. By outsourcing to GlobeOp, clients can reduce their technology investments and operational risks, while increasing their focus on asset generation and portfolio management. Established in 2000, GlobeOp serves approximately 200 clients worldwide, representing $171 billion in assets under administration (as of 30 September 2011). Headquartered in London and New York, GlobeOp employs over 2,000 people on three continents through its 10 offices in the Cayman Islands, India, Ireland, the UK and US.,,


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