Wed, Oct 7, 2015
Welcome Guest
Free Trial RSS
Get FREE trial access to our award winning publications
Alternative Market Briefing

Stanley Druckenmiller: Expansion in credit during slower GDP growth is a problem for China

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Stanley Druckenmiller
Benedicte Gravrand, Opalesque Geneva: - In its latest Equity Research report, Goldman Sachs examines the rising cost of growth in China and Asia, which is hurting profits and returns. The authors, Hugo Scott-Gall and Sumana Manohar, ask two questions, namely, who does China need, and who needs China. "The answer to the first is solutions providers to the rising costs and constraints (e.g. energy efficiency, food science, shale expertise)", the report states. "Second, for those who need China, for either low-cost goods or capital (i.e. debt heavy, consumption-driven economies) or to buy hard commodities, the future maybe tougher, while those who rely on China as a source of export growth need to ensure that domestic competition won’t undermine them."

Stanley Druckenmiller, chairman and CEO of Duquesne Family Office (which used to be Duquesne Capital Management from 1981 to 2010), tells Goldman Sachs in an interview that the problem in China is in its expansion in credit just when the GDP growth is slowing down. He believes it is all due to the 2009-11 stimulus, which slowed down future growth by crowding out more productive investments.

"The system’s building enough leverage and misallocation of resources to warrant risks of a financial crisis," he adds, although the timing of such an event is uncertain. The credit growth outpacing economic growth that we see in China sinc......................

To view our full article Click here

Today's Exclusives Today's Other Voices More Exclusives
Previous Opalesque Exclusives                                  
More Other Voices
Previous Other Voices                                               
Access Alternative Market Briefing

  • Top Forwarded
  • Top Tracked
  • Top Searched
  1. U.S. hedge funds prepare for worst finish this year since 2008[more]

    Komfie Manalo, Opalesque Asia: U.S.-focused hedge funds are preparing for their worst year since the 2008 global financial crisis, following a series of letdown including the market sell-off in August and the sell-off in healthcare and biotechnology sectors last month, reported

  2. Investing - AQR Capital and Renaissance Technologies raise stakes in Southwest Airlines[more]

    From In the previous part of this series, we saw how institutional investors played Southwest Airlines (LUV) in 2Q15. Now let’s move on to the trades executed by key hedge funds in Southwest Airlines over the same period. … Most of the hedge funds that had significant exposu

  3. DoubleLine’s Jeffrey Gundlach warns of another round of market shakedown[more]

    Komfie Manalo, Opalesque Asia: DoubleLine Capital co-founder Jeffrey Gundlach is painting a bleak future as he warned that the U.S. equity market and other risk markets, such as high-yield "junk" bonds, are facing another round of selling pressure. Gundlach said in an interview with

  4. A hedge fund strategy that seems to have fizzled[more]

    From The hedge fund strategy that has attracted the most money this year is on course to cause some of the biggest losses for investors, in the latest example of the dangers of going with the crowd. Institutions and individuals have piled an estimated $20 billion (Dh73 billion) into ma

  5. Hedge fund Barnegat survives September’s market selloff[more]

    Komfie Manalo, Opalesque Asia: Bob Treue’s $679 million Barnegat Fund proved resilient after another month of market letdown as the hedge fund gained 2.2% last month, bringing its year-to-date gains to 2.8%. Treue said in his monthly report to i